CoMentis Focused on Finding a Treatment

Alzheimer’s disease is a devastating condition for those afflicted as well as their family members and caregivers; the situation is only getting worse as the population ages. CoMentis is dedicated to finding a treatment for this crippling disease. Our BACE inhibitor program aims to halt the disease process in its tracks and offer hope for those who are impacted. In addition, the Alpharmagen α7 agonist and PAM programs have the potential for easing the cognitive decline experienced in Alzheimer’s disease.

A Multi-billion Dollar Drug Market

The current size of the Alzheimer’s drug market is estimated to be around $10 billion, with around 5 million people suffering from the condition in the U.S., and about 26 million worldwide. As there are currently no approved disease-modifying treatments, this market focuses solely on symptomatic treatment of the disease and is set to triple by 2022 with the approval of a disease-modifying drug. CoMentis’s approach of BACE inhibition targets the underlying disease mechanism and has the possibility of being one of the first disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer’s disease.

For more information on Alzheimer’s and its impact, please see below from alz.org:

Prevalence

An estimated 5.2 million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease in 2014, including approximately 200,000 individuals younger than age 65 who have younger-onset Alzheimer’s. Almost two-thirds of American seniors living with Alzheimer’s are women. Of the 5 million people age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s in the United States, 3.2 million are women and 1.8 million are men. The number of Americans with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias will escalate rapidly in coming years as the baby boom generation ages. By 2050, the number of people age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s disease may nearly triple, from 5 million to as many as 16 million, barring the development of medical breakthroughs to prevent, slow or stop the disease.

Mortality

More than 500,000 seniors die each year because they have Alzheimer’s. If Alzheimer’s was eliminated, half a million lives would be saved a year. Alzheimer’s is officially the 6th leading cause of death in the United States and the 5th leading cause of death for those aged 65 and older. However, it may cause even more deaths than official sources recognize. It kills more than prostate cancer and breast cancer combined. Deaths from Alzheimer’s increased 68 percent between 2000 and 2010, while deaths from other major diseases decreased. Alzheimer’s disease is the only cause of death among the top 10 in America that cannot be prevented, cured or even slowed.

Impact on Caregivers

In 2013, 15.5 million family and friends provided 17.7 billion hours of unpaid care to those with Alzheimer’s and other dementias – care valued at $220.2 billion, which is nearly eight times the total revenue of McDonald’s in 2012. More than 60 percent of Alzheimer’s and dementia caregivers are women. All caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s – both women and men – face a devastating toll. Due to the physical and emotional burden of caregiving, Alzheimer’s and dementia caregivers had $9.3 billion in additional health care costs of their own in 2013. Nearly 60 percent of Alzheimer’s and dementia caregivers rate the emotional stress of caregiving as high or very high, and more than one-third report symptoms of depression.

Cost to the Nation

Alzheimer’s disease is the most expensive condition in the nation. In 2014, the direct costs to American society of caring for those with Alzheimer’s will total an estimated $214 billion, including $150 billion in costs to Medicare and Medicaid. Despite these staggering figures, Alzheimer’s will cost an estimated $1.2 trillion (in today’s dollars) in 2050. Nearly one in every five dollars spent by Medicare is on people with Alzheimer’s or another dementia. The average per-person Medicare spending for those with Alzheimer’s and other dementias is three times higher than for those without these conditions. The average per-person Medicaid spending for seniors with Alzheimer’s and other dementias is 19 times higher than average per-person Medicaid spending for all other seniors. The financial toll of Alzheimer’s on families rivals the costs to Medicaid. Total Medicaid spending for people with Alzheimer’s disease is $37 billion and out-of-pocket spending for individuals with Alzheimer’s and other dementias is estimated at $36 billion.

Source: alzheimer’s association

For more information, please see the alzheimer’s association website, alz.org